THE OCTOPUS TRAP

A diptych of drawing on loss in an intimate and immense scale

This diptych was created during Anatomy of Loss, a residency culminating in a solo exhibition at Yorkshire Artspace's Persistence Works Gallery. It relates the intimate and immense, through the visual resonance of the cellular structure of a grieving heart, and the satellite image of a location in Africa archeologists believe to be the first known site of inter group conflict. 

 

The small image, titled The Octopus Trap (takotsubo in Japanese) refers to a type of cardiomyopathy that can occur in a deeply shocked or grief stricken heart, known as Takotsubo Syndrome - it causes the heart to change into a shape similar to that of a fisherman's octopus pot. The large image, Neatlines, is a term used in cartography for the bounding edge on a map. A word which given the context of the site draws parallels to ethnic cleansing. Where one group of people determine they have more right to exist over another. The grief of an individual, plays out across time, with global consequences.

The Octopus Trap
Neatlines